Richy: “#RichySeason” – electrifying vocal deliveries

in Reviews by
Share Button

Upstate rap artist MBK Richy from Auburn, NY has released his album “#RichySeason”. The album starts with a bang with the lead single, which is also a video, “Talk That Shit feat. Leedreamer” it’s totally unrelenting and is a good foreshadowing of what this high energy album is going to be. Richy has a great choice in beats that separates him from the herd, and forms part of that specific trait that runs across this entire album – he will do anything to keep you interested – from the beats to the rapping. Richy has a very good vocal range for an emcee; he raps low, high, and can be menacing or introspective, damn he even sings on “Chill For The Night”. This keeps the album flowing very well and creates a very high replay value. In fact this is truly one of the few recent rap albums I can sit all the way through.

Some of the lyrics can be very deep at times, and even when Richy touches on what sounds like the regular subjects that most rappers deal with, he does it differently, with more urgency and conviction. Hence you believe the guy when he speaks.

I mean how could you not be motivated by his electrifying vocal deliveries on “That Nigga” and “Positive Vibes” or “No Love”? Striking the fine line between a barrage of words, a relevant mood, and a clear message, Richy’s flow absolutely dominates this album.

The greatest surprise is the way that he can inject himself into any beat style – a banger, slow jam, a darker tune, or whatever he brings to the table. Yet, unlike many of his peers or contemporaries, his creations don’t devolve into a mish-mash of half-baked ideas.

Rather, Richy’s seething tone seals the beats together into a mostly flowing, cohesive whole. Besides the earthy tone of his voice, it seems as though Ricky is not afraid to swim upstream, as he is often over-the-top and cocky – check out his confidence on “Menacing” and “Gassed Up”. But apart from his impressive delivery, much of the appeal in Richy’s music is in the lyrics, and the wordplay, which is especially impressive on “2 Am Memoirs”.

On quite a few tracks Richy makes fair use of aggression and hostility which was also found in Wu-Tang Clan and Public Enemy back in the day, although he sounds drastically different in his beat and rhyme delivery. So the bottom line is that Richy is quite different than most other rappers you’ll hear right now.

Especially in his flow, and vocal approach, he always has something in those aspects that makes him unique whether you like it or not. Richy’s rhyme and lyrical delivery is more than just effective; it’s often what drives his songs along on “#RichySeason”!

OFFICIAL LINKS: ITUNESSOUNDCLOUDINSTAGRAMFACEBOOK

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest from Reviews

Go to Top